BOTTLED

  • Faith is always a gift of God to man, which is obtained by obedience, as all other blessings are. (Joseph F. Smith Gospel Doctrine, p. 212) ... Faith does not come without works; faith does not come without obedience to the commandments of God. (Conference Report, October 1903, p. 4)

Friday, May 18, 2012

CHARLES WILLIAM BUTTARS AND ANGELINE VILATE STEWART marriage and family

 
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Married: 18 May 1892, Logan Cache Utah
Sealed: 18 May 1892, Logan, Cache Utah

Ruben David Buttars, a son, tells about his parents courtship in an 11 page history titled 'The Story of My Mother'. "Mother and Father grew up in the same town. He was three years older than she and began going out with mother's sister Julia Ann. As families do, they teased Julia about Charles Buttars and she said she didn't think she liked him well enough to marry him. Then mother said, 'Julia, if you don't want him, let me have him.' 
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"Soon after that he called and took mother buggy riding. At that time mother was only sixteen and Dad's friends used to tease him about robbing the cradle. He would answer, 'Well, I know I've got a good one. They went together for about two years ...
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"When they decided to get married her father said, 'Well Angie, one thing about it, he will always be a good provider.' 
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"For the first few months of their married life they shared a home in Clarkston with another couple. Then they bought a farm from Hans Dahle, one and one-half miles north of Clarkston, near her father's place. On the farm was a two-roomed log house. They carried their water from the creek about a block away from the house. They got their drinking water from a spring about a block and a half away. She did her washing on a scrub board, heating the water on a wood burning stove.
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" Father's farm at that time consisted of about 160 acres. He loved horses and had quite a number of them to raise, to sell or trade for others. He was a great horseman."

Sweeping world changes occurred during the lives of this couple and their family. Such things as photography, the telegraph, and railroads their parents would have known as innovative and newfangled were followed by many inventions that changed their everyday lives. Telephones, phonographs (and other audio devices), automobiles, X-rays, and airplanes, forever altered communication, transportation, entertainment, and even health practices.

 General historic events such as the sinking of the Titanic, labor disputes and strikes, polar exploration, the American Civil Rights Act, the announcement of the Theory of Relativity as well as Darwin's research, the advent of the Suez (and later the Panama) Canals, and battles such as Wounded Knee and World War I influenced American society and in many instances human history itself. Books like Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn and War of Worlds were published, the Nutcracker premiered and Pissaro's impressionism transformed artistic expression.

A great granddaughter of Charles William Buttars, Lana Archibald, kindly provides descendants with access to much information and many photographs on a free website she maintains. She has compiled many records and writes, "Charles courted Angela Stewart on his pony. ... At the age of 21, Charles married Angeline Vilate Stewart in the Logan LDS Temple, sealed for time and all eternity. ... Angela was 18 years old.
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"They started their newly married life in a two-room log home on the ranch 2 1/2 rniles up the creek on the north side of Clarkston. Charles was granted this land under the Homestead Act, which required living on the land to redeem it. In this log home eight of their nine children were born. Their family consisted of 5 girls and 4 boys."
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Rueben's history of his mother records, "Their first child, a son named Archie [William Buttars], was born 28 July 1893 but died a few hours after birth. In the spring of 1894 her father and mother sold their place in Clarkston to [Angeline's older brother] ... Joseph [William] Stewart [1868] and with the younger children moved to Wilford, Idaho.
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That summer "5 August 1894, a daughter, Mary Vilate Buttars was born to my parents. Dad bought more land, and as he spent much of his time riding in the hills looking out for his horses, he hired a man to help with the farm work. This made extra work for mother as she had to cook for him.
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"One day when father was away the hired man was plowing quite a distance away over a hill. He was late coming to dinner, so mother decided to go see what had happened to him. When she got there she found him fast asleep lying in the shade of the horses."

Lana Archibald's history of Angeline records, "They started their newly married life in a two-room log house about 2 ½ miles north of Clarkston, on a ranch of about 240 acres. It was a homestead ranch. The interior of the log house was lined with "factory cloth" which was kept whitewashed to be spotlessly clean and sweet smelling.
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"Angeline did the work of a pioneer woman, carrying water from the creek to do her washing on a washboard. She cared for her family efficiently. She cooked and cared for many hired men. She picked currants and gooseberries from the thorny bushes to put up her fruit. She also grew her own rhubarb and sageplant. She was a busy woman, a good manager, and a happy wife."
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Ruben records,"Many times Dad would leave at night just before dark to ride in the hills, to find his horses, and wouldn't get back until very late. This worried mother very much, and she would stay up until very late listening for his return. He always rode a very fine pony and mother could tell by the hoof beats and the familiar tune he whistled as he rode. when  he was coming.
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"Dad loved to talk and visit his folks and many times he wouldn't come home until morning. Mother told this story: -
One morning very early he was riding toward home. He passed another man out irrigating. The man said, "Charles where have you been”
"Oh", Dad said, "I've been out all night counting the stars."
"Well," the man said, "did you get them all counted?"
Dad answered, "All but about half an acre and then the sun came up."
Lana's Archilbald's web account informs readers, "One day [30 May 1899, Charles] took his fast team of horses and drove his cousin Mary Harmon, her baby and his mother to Logan. They went by way of the Benson Ward road. When they were about half-way across the Bear River bridge in Benson, it broke and the buggy, horses and all the people went into the water. A heavy timber fell across Grandma Sarah Keep Buttars, badly cutting her head. As Charles was trying to get the timber off her, he saw the baby floating downstream. Just before it floated under the broken bridge, he caught its clothing and saved its life. He needed help quickly, so he yelled for help loud enough for workers in a field a mile away to hear and come. Upon getting Grandma Sarah on the river bank, they felt sure she wouldn't live. The field workers came two days later to attend her funeral but found her very much alive."

A news story of the time stated:

June 1, 1900 - p. 5 under "Mrs. Buttars' Condition."
"Victim of the Bridge Accident May Die."
    "Logan, May 31.--A report came here today from Clarkston that Mrs. Butters [sic], who was injured on Tuesday by the collapse of the Benson bridge, died of the injuries received this morning.  The report cannot be verified, but the physician who attended Mrs. Butters say that her injuries were so serious that fatal results were probable.
    "It is prettey [sic] certain that a heavy damage suit will be planted against the county, as negligence was the cause of the bridge giving way."

      --Salt Lake Herald, June 1, 1900.
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Ruben continues "Five more children were born at this place [the farm/ranch approximately 2 miles north of Clarkston]: Lillie, Ben, Sadie, Lucy, and Amy. [These 5 children were, Lillie Pearlue Buttars - 26 August 1896, Benjamin Charles Buttars - 20 June 1898, Sarah Maud Buttars - 22 February 1900, Lucy Ann Buttars - 5 June 1902, and Amy Lavon Buttars - 8 February 1904.]
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Clarkston, Utah 1900 US Census Charles William Buttars family
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" There two more families living nearby, Uncle Joe Stewarts', and the James Clarks' family. They would take turns driving the children to school. They said they were always happy to ride with Dad because he had such fast horses." 
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Lana's history of Charles informs us that, "Charles' life was his family and his horses. Sometimes he held his children four or five at a time, because many days he rose so early and got home so late, he never saw them.
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"Charles loved his horses as few men do. He doctored them, put them in slings, and ruptured his own side doing it. His horses were beauties and understood his every word. He ran hundreds of head of horses on the range for other people, up in the mountains above Clarkston where they got summer feed. His own little pony "Little Bolly" he rode with pride, a beautiful bay who was eager to respond to the touch of his hand. The people of the town could tell when he was coming by the rhythm of his horse's footsteps. It took a lot of riding to keep track of and care for this many horses. He found it necessary to keep several hired men to assist him in his different tasks.

"He farmed well, an inherited characteristic of the Buttars family. Charles' home and surroundings were scrupulously clean and wholesome. 'The Buttars' were known as good citizens, good managers, hard workers, very progressive and loyal people to the community they lived in. They helped it to grow. He was loved and respected by all who knew him. He stood for what was right and honest to the core, regardless of the cost. He was cheerful in disposition and loved to talk and visit with people. He often would sing or whistle. He was always aware of others' needs and was on hand to offer himself or what he had. He was an advisor to many. He was a thoughtful husband.

"It was said that Charles always wanted to give his wife every thing she wanted, as near as it was possible. He was quick in thought and action. He saved Angie's life many times during asthma attacks. She was so proud of him, his physical stature, his love and kindness to her, and his good looks.
 
Charles William Buttars 
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"He was a well-built man, six feet tall in his stocking feet. He had strong square shoulders, dark wavy hair and grey-green eyes.

"Charles' mother, Sarah Keep Buttars, lived in Clarkston, too. He was a very dear son to her. He often went to see her. She had many flower gardens around her home, and when Charles got ready to leave after a visit, she would tuck a sweet pea in his hat band."
His father was there with them as well.
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Ruben's history of his mother informs us, "Mother's health wasn't too good. She had developed a very bad case of asthma and would wake up at night unable to breathe. Dad would hurriedly hitch up his team of fastest horses put her in the buggy and take her to the hills to a higher altitude so she could breathe again. Many nights she was unable to lie down at all.
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" I, Ruben, was born 5 June 1906. That fall they brought a ten acre tract of land just north of Clarkston to be nearer school and church. They bought a two roomed house and moved it onto the ten acres and Dad built two more rooms on it. This is where mother lived and raised her family.
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"30 May 1908, my youngest brother Earl [Samuel Buttars] was born, making a family of eight [living] children." 
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Lana notes in Charles history that,"He had a close call with death when lightening struck him at the barn door and left him unconscious. His watch crystal in his left shirt pocket was powder. Without the watch there to catch the lightening, he would have died.

"Charles was able to obtain more land as his family grew and needed more, giving them more of the comforts of life. When the time came for the three oldest children to go to school, they moved from the ranch to a lot by City Creek on the north side of town. This home was still just a two-room log house with a room in the attic. They walls were covered with "factory cloth" and were whitewashed to add thickness and cleanliness. 

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"On this house was added a lean-to on the west and one on the south (before he died Charles had lumber on hand to build the barn). From here the children still had seven blocks to go to school. The winters in Clarkston were harsh, with lots of snow and wind. So hitching up a team of horses to a sleigh was sometimes necessary to take the children to school."
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In Angeline's history Lana writes, "Their home in town was a two-room log house with an attic upstairs. ... It was about three blocks north of town, out by City Creek. During her childbearing years Angie contracted asthma, which was a detriment to her health. She would sit up most of the night sometimes, because she couldn't breathe when she lay down. Charles ... would hitch up the team and take Angeline to the mountains in the night because she could breathe better up there. This went on quite a long time. Then she decided to go to the temple and be given a prayer for her health. After that she improved gradually until she was relieved and cured. This was a faith-promoting incident to all of her children. They were so happy to have their mother well."

In Charles history Lana continues,"In 1908, at the age of 37, Charles began to feel pain and distress. He had a hernia. He blamed it on riding his pony after the horses so much. The horses were a good breed, lively prancing 'Percherons.' He enjoyed the speed they had when they went places and the time they saved.
 
"Charles was a good singer and spent much time rocking a couple of the children at a time and singing them to sleep. Ben well remembered him rocking and singing all the songs he knew to his children on the night before he passed away. In October [
he] was stricken very suddenly and severely by an appendicitis attack. 
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"All that could be done was done to help him. It took 10-12 hours to get a doctor to Clarkston, and then when he did get there it was too late. The appendix had broken. Charles died that night of October 5, 1908 in much agony and pain. He was 37 years old. [In Angeline's history we read that the doctor was able to give him a pill to relieve the pain.]

"From that moment on was when the true character of his wife, Angeline was shown. Standing the shock, she took on the responsibility of raising [eight] children, all under the age of 14 years, alone. The oldest boy, Ben, was only ten years old. The baby boy, Earl, was only four months old. Angeline raised her children alone for twenty-three years and was a noble mother to them."

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1910 US Census for Clarkston, Utah shows Angeline,
widowed with 8 young children
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Ruben also tells about his father's illness and death. " The following fall [after the youngest child was born 30 May1908], a very sad thing happened. Dad had been riding in the hills all day hunting for his horses. Upon returning he complained of a pain in his side. But in spite of the pain, he followed his usual custom and gathered his family around and sang songs to them just before bedtime.
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" By morning he was very ill, and they sent for the Doctor. The Doctor had to come from Logan, a distance of about 20 miles with a horse and buggy. By the time the Doctor arrived, Dad was delirous. there wasn't much the Doctor could do, and at 10 O'clock that night he passed away. Later they figured he must have had a ruptured appendix. 
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" At the time of his funeral mother was so ill with asthma that she couldn't attend the services so they had some one take it down in short hand and read it to her. 
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" Mother was very devoted to father and was always telling us stories of his goodness and generosity, and what a wonderful man he was."
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Back row left to right: May Vilate Buttars, Earl, Ruben, Bennie, Lucy.
Far left - Father. Front row left to right: Amy, Lillie, Mother, Sadie
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Several years ago Papa and I visited Uncle Arlun Ames and his daughter Charlun, Papa's cousin, in the Seattle area. He graciously permitted us to laser photocopy several pages of his photo albums. On the lower left of a picture of Angeline with her adult children someone had attached a picture of Charles. The family is all there except the baby, Archie, that died at birth.

Lana Archibald, granddaughter to Ben Buttars, has compiled several records and summarizes the situation succinctly. "Angie decided to keep the farm and sell the horses to pay the debt. Somehow they got by. Ben [age 10] helped round up the horses and found all but eighteen. All were sold except a gentle team of trotters for the buggy, and a mare to raise colts. By the time Ben was sixteen, he ran the farm and provided for the family by himself."
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Clarkston, Utah 1920 US census. Angeline with children

Although some records briefly tell about this young widow raising her children, and managing the farm and livestock while struggling with her asthma and a later diagnoses of diabetes, only one records the passing of any loved ones. We know this was a close knit family that helped and depended upon each other. We also know that many of the extended relatives (from the Buttars, Keep, Stewart, and Clark families) lived in close proximity. Charles father, David Buttars, died 23 November 1911 at Clarkston. Angeline's mother, Mary Ann Clark Stewart died 7 December 1916 at nearby Teton City, Idaho.

Ruben tells us about the death of his sister. "18 August 1929 my sister Mae (Mary) died from complications following an operation, leaving five small children. [Wallace Will Ames, age 8 - Papa's father, is one of these children]. This upset mother very much."
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Back l-r Narva, Ruby, Mae (and her children), with Angeline,
her mother. Front l-r Arlun, and Wallace
Photo taken by Mae's son Charley Ames about June 1929.

[Angeline] was taken to the hospital, went into a coma and died 30 May 1931, the day her youngest son was 23 years old. She was buried in the Clarkston cemetery ... by the side of her beloved husband and infant son, survived by three sons, four daughters, her father, four sisters, and seven brothers."
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Lana's history of Angeline witnesses, "She had been given a blessing early in her life that she would live until the time her family was grown. When her youngest child, Earl, was 23 years old, she died on May 30, 1931, at the age of 57 years. All her children were married in the temple."


Special thanks to Lana Archibald and other family members for their work preserving, digitizing and publishing many documents and photographs of this family in ways that help those histories and photos to be available to all descendants.