BOTTLED

  • "Beauty is the secret sound of the deepest thereness of things." John O'Donohue

Sunday, April 22, 2012

FRANCES ALOIS HUCKINS history

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Born: 22 April 1875, Neponset, Bureau, Illinois
Some records say Frances is born in nearby Peoria. 
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Father:  James William Huckins (1843-1909)
 Son of Johnathan Crawford Huckins born 1802 
     and Abigail Aldrich born 1804
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Mother: Mary Elizabeth Middleton (1856-1909)
Daughter of James Middleton born 1804 
     and Elizabeth Hisong born 1822
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Fannie's father was born in eastern Canada at Montreal, Quebec. This area was also frequently referred to as 'Canada' [or previously 'Lower Canada', meaning closer to the mouth of the river - distinguished from 'Upper Canada' an area further 'up' the river]. 
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Many early immigrates to North Amercia, especially from England, France and other areas of Europe, traveled up the St. Lawrence River and through the Great Lakes along the waterway chain connecting the east-central interior of North America to the Atlantic Ocean.
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 Montreal was the furthest point  the largest vessels could reach at that time. The remainder of this 'highway', extending deeply through 2 of what became the largest Canadian provinces, connects 9 states along the US/Canada border. It was traversed in segments in smaller vessels.

Encyclopedia Britannica 2004 map showing Great Lakes and St Lawrence River
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Wikipedia tells us, "People during the era routinely traveled huge distances, and the river was the principal route for people, supplies, arms, and commercial goods. Despite the need to portage past the Lachine Rapids, Niagara Falls, and other shallow rapids, the St. Lawrence was far easier to travel than rugged, inland routes. The importance of the St. Lawrence as the primary water route for shipping American goods westward receded with the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825, thus allowing a more southerly route stretching from New York City to Lake Erie to serve settlements in the Midwest." 
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The population of this area included many immigrants. It also included many Loyalists that fled to Canada during the American Revolutionary War, and Native Americans that were expelled from the US at that time. The War of 1812 significantly impacted the area around the Great Lakes as the US declared war on Britain (Canada was a British territory) and poorly prepared and motivated American and British forces both captured and lost disputed territories. It was a war neither side really wanted or had the means or manpower to prosecute. Britain in particular was preoccupied with Napoleon and the French.
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Fannie's mother was born in Elkhart, Indiana. It is just east of the southern end of Lake Michigan. That area and its many resources lie between the tips of Lake Michigan and Lake Huron and were commonly used by many Native American tribes well into the 1800's. 
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From Richard Dean Taylor we learn: The village  platted as 'Elkhart' in 1832, near the convergence of 3 streams east of Lake Michigan had been 'fluidly' occupied by small Indian, trapper, and early missionary camps and settlements for centuries. It became the Town of Elkhart in 1859. Like many other river towns of the era it was situated on busy and well known trade routes with many heavily used trails and roads. Steamboat transport reached a zenith for a short few years and died out suddenly as the railroad arrived in the 1850's. "In 1850 the town had a 780 inhabitants and by 1870 2,053." Population and commercial interests expanded exponentially and in 1875 Elkhart incorporated as a city.
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The Great Chicago Fire of October 1871, that killed and injured hundreds, and destroyed 3.3 square miles of the city of Chicago was one of the largest disasters of the 19th century in the United States . As the city was rebuilt it reshaped the economy of this region.
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Fannie's parents were married in Stuart, Guthrie, Iowa 18 June 1871 (500 miles west of Elkhart) and their first child, a son they name Burton Blanchard Huckins was born there on March 10, 1872.  The family appears to be steadily migrating west.  
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Neponset, where Fannie was born, is a small village in Illinois (about halfway between Elkhart and Stuart) with a total area of approximately one square mile, all of it land. The community was established in 1855 when the newly completed Central Military Tract Railroad (later renamed the Chicago, Burlington, Quincy Railroad) built a station there.
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Soon afterward, the US Post Office was moved to Neponset from Brawby, a hamlet formerly located two miles north of the present village. It was named for the Massachusetts hometown of Myron Lee, the railroad's first agent at the Neponset station.
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We do not know why Fannie's birthplace is contrary to the usual pattern and westward movement we see this family experiencing and 250 miles is a long way to go 'back east' by horse and buggy or wagon. We do know that she was born at a time when Railroads were rapidly expanding. This allowed people to travel much greater distances safely in more comfort and significantly reduced the time journeys took. Did they travel by rail? We do not know. Maps of railroads do show rail travel may have been available and did radiate out from the Great Lakes region, particularly near the southern areas of Lake Michigan.
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Possible railroads that may have been available for use.
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We see Fannie's siblings born further and further West. Eventually 4 brothers and 3 sisters (8 children in all) join the Huckins family. The youngest is born one year before she marries.

Locations of some events in Fannie's life. 
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George Augustus Huckins 1877, Des Moines, Polk, Iowa;
Daisy D Huckins1879, Gray, Audubon, Iowa:
Cora (also called Corrie) Huckins 1881, Gray, Audubon, Iowa;
Alonzo Benjamin Harrison Huckins 1883,
       Hill City, Pennington, South Dakota;
Bertha Mabel Huckins 1885, Gray, Audubon Iowa;
Clarence Wilford Huckins 1889, Olreichs, Fall River, South Dakota.
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1880 Cameron, Audubon County, Iowa
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The 1880 census shows James and Mary Huckins living in Cameron, Audubon, Iowa with 4 children, 2 girls and 2 boys. It is about 12 miles west of Gray on the map above - so near that the locating tag for Gray disappears behind the tag for Cameron. Frances Alois is 5 years old. Her father is working in carpentry.

1885 Cameron, Audubon County, Iowa
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The 1885 Iowa State census for Carroll, Warren County (26 miles south of Cameron - not on map above) shows Fannie A Huckins, age 10, with her parents and sibings. The birth place for her youngest sister, Bertha  Mabel Huckins born 15 January 1885, is listed as Gray. Her father is farming and is subject to military service and entitled to vote. Women in Iowa did not have the right to vote until Congress passed an amendment in 1919. There are columns to designate if people can read and write but not even one person on this sheet is checked - perhaps the census taker did not feel it was necessary information.
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Spouse: James Andrew McNicholl
Married 6 June 1890
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In March 1910 her husband of 20 years died where they are living at Grangeville, Idaho. She is a widow at age 35. Her father died 8 months before then and on the census in June we see she is head of household in Washington State living with her daughters, 3 brothers, her mother and a nephew. 
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She remarries a gold miner named Roy Dougherty (spelling varies) that has lived in her mother's boarding house while her father was the foreman of a mine on the Lower Methow in Okanogan County Washington. They live in California and Oregon. 
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Died:17 May 1918, Weatherby, Baker, Oregon 
Buried: 1918 Malheur, Malheur, Oregon

Saturday, April 21, 2012

SUNSHINE CUPCAKES


'Bunny Corn' was .25 per bag after Easter.

sort out all the broken peices - kids will love to eat them for you

I wanted to try out these sunny cupcakes.
I bought a boat load of Candy Corn - and needed it!
Well, really only half of it ... do you need some?

Too much good sweet stuff! 
I made miniature cupcakes - 1 tsp of batter per cup - from a plain yellow cake mix that was on hand begging to be used up. I split it and only mixed half at once so I could bake them in stages. I whipped 2 eggs, 1/2 plus 1/8 cup water, and 1 Tablespoon of oil together and then added that to each cake mix part (measured in halves). Half a batch made 48 mini cupcakes.


I cooked some lemon pudding/pie filling and used a decorator bag to squirt it into the centre of each cupcake. Just plunge the point of the tip into the centre and squeeze - be careful not to overfill. This gave an subtle lemon flavor to the finished product.

I iced these with a bright lemon yellow butter cream frosting - made with butter of course! I always use about 2/3 butter and 1/3 shortening. Keep it spreadable but not thin.  And don't skimp on the coloring - put in LOTS! To achieve a shiny smooth-ish surface dip a flat edged table knife of spatula in a glass of warm water and swipe it across the frosting. Allow it to set slightly but not dry before decorating. Working with 3-5 at one time seems to work.


Now came the fun part. Drop on 2 mini chocolate chips for eyes - use your imagination and keep them near the centre-ish.


Snip off a chunk of 'peel-and-pull' red licorice - approximately 1 inch - more or less, and peel it apart. Because these cupcakes were so tiny I also snipped the licorice in half lengthwise with scissors.

Pinch on piece into a 'U' and  set it below the eyes (almost touching) for the smile.  Exact position will vary and add character.

This fellow was one of the first - I learned to make the 'U' more narrow 

Make sure to start with a tight 'U' as it tends to pop wider - it will 'relax' a bit.

Finally position a few candy corn to make sunshine rays around the perimeter of the cupcake.  Be sure to keep the base of each well onto the cake. TIP:  angle tip upwards (see left centre above). This will help them to not slip and droop - that was not fun to fix - not too hard though.

I preferred the look of fewer with a slight space
between fewer candy corn
If your candy corn are drooping or slipping off put them closer to the centre and use fewer that are spaced further apart. Drooping may also mean your icing is a bit too thin or soft. If they won't stick your icing is too dry - just put a small dot under each one.


The simplest way to transport these to an event is to carry them in the pan/s they baked in.

Notice not all of them turn out perfectly smooth -
the rougher guys  were eaten just as quickly though.

These were simple, inexpensive and fairly fast to complete.


Welcome back SUNSHINE!!




Friday, April 20, 2012

NEIL SNOW FORSYTH death

My father's father, my paternal grandfather, lived in our home in Kimball Valley, Alberta for a few years prior to passing away. I remember him well. He attended many family events and was generally of good cheer and was of sound mind.

August 1972 Garth Forsyth with his father
Neil Snow Forsyth - likely at Chrystal's blessing.
Grandpa would be 93. Notice how tall they are
compared to each other. Dad is about 6' tall. 
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Grandpa Neil Snow Forsyth was fiercely independent and a hard worker. He was very strong even though he was not a large man. My father fills each minute with productive activity of some type. Once day Papa mentioned this to him. He scoffed and said, "My father could always do twice as much work as I ever could. Even when he was in his 70's he could out work me."

Neil's own history tells us, " May 24, [1964] I rented the Workman house to Barry Beamer for a year at $35 a month. I spent the next day fixing it up some. Then I did a small finishing job for Mrs. Able. It took me 4 days to finish and I asked Garth to come and pick me and my tools up on the 4th day. He and Jean came about 4 PM and I wasn't through so Garth stopped to help me finish. Mrs. Able went out and asked Jean in, but she said she would wait in the car. She started telling Jean how fast I was and how well I had done the work. Jean asked how old she thought I was, she said about 65. Jean told her I was 85 in Aug, she was sure surprised."

When Papa and I married my father was double Papa's age. Papa worked on dad's construction crew and said Dad could work circles around him and do twice or more the work of any man he knew ... he never knew my grandfather.

August 1976 - Ruth and Neil Snow Forsyth on his 97th birthday.  

Family often met at the Kimball Park near the St. Mary's River bridge in August to celebrate Grandpa's August birthday. His children and grandchildren that could, always came. On his 97th birthday 2 cakes cut into tiny pieces didn't go very far. He passed away less than a year later. His second wife accompanied him to that reunion and celebration. He married the widow, Ruth Spencer Rassmussen, 2 years after Grandma Chloe died. They traveled extensively and attended the temples together and generally shared the aging process for about 10 years. Her birthday was on August 10th.

Grandpa had one great and pressing agenda prior to his death. He wanted every person in the family to know the reality of Jesus Christ. He wanted to be sure each one of us personally heard and knew that he knew Jesus Christ is the son of God. He wanted us to know that the Church of Jesus Christ is on earth today as it was anciently (as described in the Bible). He wanted us to know that Joseph Smith was a prophet and that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints is true. He also especially wanted us to know that temple covenants and ordinances are for eternity - forever. He often spoke of Grandma Chloe and the 51 years they had shared. He told us these things many, many times.

age 95

My mother's sewing machine was tucked into a corner of the room that became his bedroom and living area. He was very hard of hearing but I would ask him to tell me about his life and he could sit for hours and do so. I was young and they were nice stories. I don't remember most of them.

One story I remember was about his grandmother Sally Adams. She knew Lucy Mack Smith, the mother of the Prophet Joseph. She told him about her experiences with that family and that they were good and honest people. She told him personal experiences about the translation and publication of the Book of Mormon and that she knew those things were truth. She was a reliably honest person. So was he. He was known, in the little town of Cardston where he kept a grocery store and a hotel, for his honesty and integrity.

Near the last of his life my grandfather needed special nursing care my mother and father were unable to provide he so was moved into the Cardston Auxilary Hospital, a long term care facility. He had always wanted to live to be 100 years old but as the indignities of aging took their toll he began to wish he might not. Whenever possible my parents would bring him out home for a visit - at first sometimes overnight and nearer the end of his life for increasingly shorter time periods.

Neil Snow Forsyth summer of 1975 about age 96

Grandpa Forsyth did not want to have a body that needed to be cared for like a baby. His keen and independent mind often rebelled. When he died it was a relief and blessing for everyone but oh how he was missed. It was like a part of our foundations of life were missing. He was ... he was ... well, he just WAS!


Cover of funeral program

Funeral program for Neil Snow Forsyth


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Died:  17 April 1977 Cardston, Alberta, CANADA
Buried: 20 April 1977 Cardston, Alberta, CANADA
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Thursday, April 19, 2012

DEAR RYAN

Happy Birthday!

Chocolate on Mother's Day is always a good choice ...

We hope your birthday turns out as good as the delicious food you so often make.  We appreciate your culinary skills and enjoy the many delicious meals you have welcomed us with.

We have seen water fights but a 'real' paint was a first -
 glad you gave those kiddos goggles along with the sponges!!!

You make every visit memorable.

There are some we may never forget!



Thanks for being a wonderful and fun part of our family. And especially thanks for riding in the back with the  big slobbering dogs! You are amazing.

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

WILLIAM WARREN and PHOEBE ALICE CAMPBELL marriage and family

17 April 1900 is the day more than a century ago that, according to family records, my mother's grandparents were married.  Marriage records for Idaho indicate that they were married April 18, 1900 in Marion, Cassia, Idaho.
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A very old fashioned song that I learned many years ago, titled 'Lavender Blue', comes to mind when I think of that time

Phoebe Alice Tolman and William Warren Campbell

Maybe it comes to mind because the first line starts with, "Great Grandfather met Great Grandmother when she was a shy young miss ..."
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The words to the song may not be entirely accurate in this case because she had been married (see document at bottom), had a baby girl 18 June 1897, Ila Vera Clark, [that died 17 Feb 1899 at Marion, Cassia, Idaho] and was divorced [from Peter Clark] when Great Grandfather met her.
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William Warren Campbell
Phoebe Alice Tolman
Married: 17 April 1900
Sealed: 11 Jul 1900 Manti, Utah Temple


My Grandfather, William David Campbell, wrote:
     "In 1897 [my father] got a job with a sheepman, William Tolman, whose daughter became my mother, Phoebe Alice Tolman. My father was with him during the sheep and cattleman war in Idaho. It was during this time that he met my mother.

"He went to Idaho in 1898 to work for William Tolman. It was at this time that the [sheep and cattleman] war went on and he told me how they would change their bed every night to a different position so that the head of the bed would be in a different direction for the cattlemen would shoot at the head of the beds.

"One cattleman told my Grandfather [William Tolman] he would shoot him on sight the next time he saw him. One day he was riding in a strange part of the range when he saw a cabin and when he knocked on the door a man opened it, reached up, up above it for a rifle and shot him. The bullet went through him, and then through the neck of the horse, killing the horse. Another horseman found him and took him home. It was six months before he could ride again.

"My father started to court my mother, Phebe Alice Tolman and they were married in the Spring of April 17, 1900. They decided to take the sheep camp wagon and started for Cardston, Alberta, Canada."


The 1900 US Census for Marion, Cassia, Idaho shows William Warren Campbell
with his wife Alice (heavy black arrow) living near his father and family
(lighter arrow) and other family (a sister and her family -Joseph Shurtz).

Howard K Campbell, son of Warren Earl Campbell, and grandson to William Warren Campbell tells some memories in a short family history published on the internet 13 October 2010. He writes:
     "In 1873 a report was made to the Dominion Government describing the west as being 'without law, order, or security for life or property'. As a result the North West Mounted Police was formed. In the year 1874 a force left Dufferin on the Red River travelling west looking for suitable locations for detachments. All Canada west of the Great Lakes was opened up by traders and settlers under the wing of the mounted police. Under this influence peace and security were the rule.

"Settlers moved into the Hill Spring District. In 1880 the Cochrane Ranch was founded by Senator Mathew Mullins. It was a going concern when the Mormon pioneers under President Charles Ora Card founded Cardston in 1887. 


"In 1906 the mormon church purchased the Cochrane Ranch. In 1908 President Wood started dividing this land for settlement. Seymour Smith was hired to survey the land and locate two townsites. One where Hill Spring now stands. A few people took the land in 1908 namely Drapers(built the first home in the district), Bill Wynder and William Tolman. In 1909 a few more families came, Alex Leishman and William Warren Campbell. Carl Tanner built the first home in the townsite in 1909-10. In June of 1910 President Wood came to Hillspring from Cardston. The people came from near and far. Among those present were F.P. Fisher family, Thomas Davies family, Carl Tanner family, Sid Tanner family, Allred family, Garner family, Alex Leishman family, W.C. Smith family, Hendrickson family, Richardson family, William Warren Campbell family and the Albert Tolman family.

"My father Earl Warren Campbell was born June 02 1910 in a one room house which his father later turned into a granery. He was the first baby boy to be born in Hillspring Alberta. On the 12th of June 1910 the ward was organized .The first school house was built in 1911. In 1914 the telephone was brought into the district. The sports were sponsored by the Mormon Church. Scout trips to Waterton Lakes. Badger holes his horse use to step in. His mother Phoebe Alice Tolman(Campbell) graduated from nursing school in 1917. Baseball and Track champions in 1930. Held the M.M. team cup in the Mormon Church till 1937. HillSpring was such a pretty place. He left Hill Spring in the fall of 1942. He was in the army services in World War 2. Trained boxer. Came to Vancouver British Columbia. Married my mother Eileen Mary Crandell(Campbell). Had five children(three boys and two girls)."


William David Campbell continues:
     "In 1900 they were in Cardston for a short time, then decided to go further north to Lacombe, Alberta. Here they homesteaded at Bentley in the same area as the Tolmans that were already there. In September they built a sod house and broke some land. I, William David [Campbell], was born in the spring of 1901 one year later and my brother [Laurence] Edward [Ted Campbell]was born in 1902" [at Lacombe]. Records on new.familysearch.org show, inaccurately, Uncle Ted was born in Idaho in 1899. Other family records state he was born 10 December 1902 in Lacombe.]

A 1906 Canadian census locates Phoebe's father William Augustus 
Tolman (midway down right side marked with black arrow) with 
his wife and 4 youngest children in the Province of Alberta, 
Strathcona District 37 B, section 24, township 42, range 2, meridian 5 
with a post office address of Rimby. He arrived in Canada in 1900 and 
owns 10 horses, 8 milk cows, and 4 'other horned or meat' cattle.

"At that time it was so wet for two years. The grain that was planted didn't ripen so they [his parents] decided to move back to Cardston. In 1905 they stated back in the same covered Wagon. On the way we camped by a bridge. I wanted to play on the bridge. Mother said, 'If you go on that bridge it will go up with you, that stopped me.'

"On the way it seemed like there were a thousand Indians. Sometimes my father was away from the camp to get the horses. That was when the Indians would come into camp to bother mother. She had my brother Edward in a baby carriage. The squaws wanted to take him out of the carriage. Mother always carried a six shooter. She got it out from under the pillow and started shooting in the air."


[Family records indicate that
Alberta Pearl Campbell was born 16 February 1905 at Rimbey Alberta. She lived most of her life in Idaho.]

"We arrived in Cardston in the fall of 1906 and my father started to work as operator of the Card Estate in Cardston until 1907. Then the Tolmans moved back to Cardston and built a new home there in 1907 and also a home on Belly River 3 miles south of where Hillspring is now."

[Parley Merlin Campbell was born
20 October 1907 at Cardston Alberta.]

"My father left the Cardston job and went to work for Grandfather Tolman freighting lumber from the Henery Hansen Saw Mill at Waterton Lakes. In 1909 my father bought 1/4 section of land on the East shore of Strawberry Lake south of Hillspring.

"We lost this farm and got another 1/2 section west of Hillspring on the Waterton River [abt 1918] ... In 1918 [my father] bought the Walter Caldwell place; 1/2 section North side of the lake.and lived there for 6 years.



Phoebe Alice Tolman Campbell

"In 1917 my mother, Phebe Alice Tolman Campbell, took a nursing course under Dr. Ellis R Shipley, a lady doctor. Mother was a wonderful person and served in her nursing night and day bringing a great number of babies into the world - while raising a family of 9 children, 2 girls and 7 boys."
Warren Earl Campbell was born June 2, 1910 - "the first baby boy to be born in Hillspring [Alberta] in 1910 ...",

Lowell Tolman Campbell was born
 December 5, 1912
at Hill Spring Alberta,

George Albert Campbell was born
March 17, 1916
at Hill Spring Alberta,

Ray Everett Campbell was born
July18, 1918
at Hill Spring Alberta.

Elsie May Campbell was born
May 3, 1921
at Hill Spring Alberta .

Except for Parley (note Elsie calls him by his middle name 'Merlin') who died at age 20 (1926) and Pearl who died at age 44, they all lived long lives.

"In 1919 the great drought began. [Bill is about 18 years of age.] We planted 200 acres of wheat and got 300 bu of wheat off the Stawberry Lake bed. That fall Dad bought a new double bedded wagon box. In June we took a load of wheat to Cardston…

"In 1919 and 1920 there was no feed in the country. Father and Marion Brooks each took a team of horses and went north to Cold Lake. All the rest of our animals died. We had 18 head of horses die. Cattle and pigs also. Marion Brooks had one cow. His son Willard Brooks and I butchered her."

My mother, Elna Jean Campbell, knew her grandparents and aunts and uncles, both the Campbells and the Tolmans. She says the Tolmans lived in Hill Spring on the next block. Mona Tolman, the daughter of George and Emily (Emma) Tolman (Phoebe's brother) was a cousin mom felt especially close to and spent a lot of time with.
Her Grandfather, William Warren Campbell, built the log cabin mom's family later moved into at Hill Spring. It was added to many times over the course of many years.

Mom says, "There was a dugout under the house. You went in from the outside. We kept fruit and vegetables and crocks of pickles in there.

"Phoebe Alice was around awhile. I knew her very little. I remember her more by picture than in person. He lived for quite a while after [she passed away.]... They always celebrated on the 1st of July. [He] owned the ice house. My dad had a 10 quart freezer and it stood about 2' high and about 15" across. They sold ice-cream at the ball games and they borrowed my dad's freezer.

"Something else interesting; my dad knew dynamite. He blew up wood for firewood. He would go out on the hills west above Hill Spring. He always blew up dynamite and everyone expected it of him every year. My dad's brothers sold salted peanuts out of old whiskey barrels everywhere, all over town ...

"We knew Uncle Ted and Aunt Jenny's kids really well. They lived up the Waterton river South West of my dad at Hill Spring. My aunts and uncles every once in awhile would have a reunion up on the Waterton River. That was while we still lived out on the farm till I was 5 or 6. [About 1935 or 1936.] Uncle Lowell lived 3 or 4 miles North West on a 1/4 section.

"When I was a teen I would get on a train [in Hill Spring] and go to Raymond to Uncle Ted and Aunt Jenny's. I went a lot and they put up with me. By then they were in Raymond. One of those kids married a Paxman ...

"In Hill Spring we had a town square all the families would walk there and just sit and visit. The Tolmans, Campbells, Davis', Fishers, Andrews or anyone else - would all get together and play ball, skip rope, Run Sheep Run. Uncle George and Aunt Emma were real singers and we sang all the way. We'd leave the church singing and sing 3 blocks home, whoever was walking home together.
"In Hill Spring there were trees around every block. The pioneers brought a piece of cottonwood and when you put it in the moist soil it would send up a shoot and grow. It could be almost any kind of tree - apple, whatever - a piece cut from a green tree and when there is lots of water it will grow. I don't know how they brought them. Look out there at Hill Spring. There are lots of trees - Merrills brought and dad helped plant them."

I often visited with Aunt Elsie Campbell Goy and I met many of her siblings - my mother's aunts and uncles. Elsie and I both lived in Lethbridge Alberta. Sometimes I took notes as she told me family history and stories. I now quote from bits of her memories, "When I was 4 or 5 I went on a train with my mother to her family and I started school when I visited there. When I came back [to Canada] I had to go back [in school]. 


1929 border crossing card for Alice Campbell and her daughter Elsie M.
on the CPR (Canadian Pacific Railway) shows that Alice was 5'9' tall, 
with a medium complexion, graying hair, and hazel eyes, and that they 
were going to her sister's Mrs. Geo Richardson in Pocatello, Idaho.

"Pearl's boyfirend teased the life out of me because I bit my nails. I also went to Salt Lake and visited my mother's sister there [Emily Althea Tolman Smith] and Etta [Mae Tolman married George Richardson] in Idaho too. 

"We had a reunion here [in Alberta] years ago. Mother's sister was in Claresholm - Aunt Clara [Clara Lovina Tolman Richardson] - her husband had died and she was by herself. I was about 13 at that time. Another came out from Pocatello Idaho. She had a daughter my age. Your Grandma [Elna Campbell] probably has it. I have pictures of the kids.

" Uncle Joel Shurtz [Joseph Francis Shurtz husband of Annie Elizabeth Campbell] wrote in my autograph book. They were very popular then you know. Everyone had one. I think I had written them [Joel and Beth]. Uncle Lowell [Tolman Campbell] (his wife is on oxygen now) lives close to Bride's Veil - he gets really enthusiastic ... had 2 girls. All the family [came].

" Another reason I remember those relatives [from the train trip] is they had a parrot. He sat on my knee and took a bite out of it. I can still remember the tabernacle from then.

"I remember my brother Merlin and he played the guitar and harmonica. I'd sit behind him and comb his hair."


While researching this family on the internet I found a picture of a 'Campbell Family Band'. Great Grandpa and Grandma are in the picture and he appears to have a harmonica in his hand. It is taken in LeGrande Oregon about 1937.

back row: Deward Winn, _______,
                 Rosetta Ann Campbell Schooler,  
                 Phoebe Alice Tolman Campbell,
                 Charles Wilbur Schooler, 
                 Susanna Campbell Winn Knapp,
                 Warren Campbell
front row: Jospeh Lester Schooler,
                 Joel Campbell,
                 Johnny Grant Schooler
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A similar picture of the Campbell Family Band 

"There's a lot of hills in Burley. Now Joe Shurtz, they lived in a tent at the bottom of this hill. A circus came at the top of that great long hill and my dad was working out of the sheep ranch. They moved to Caldwell. Did anyone look in Rupert [for this family]? I think she had her little Joanne in Rupert.

with some siblings

[Once] "A knock came at the door - 'Are you Pearl Jamison?[Are you related to Ray and George?' Anyway they got caught sneaking over the line, [the US/Canada border] and ended up in custody and not allowed to come across again. Pearl was there for years and years. When Pearl came back to momma's funeral then they wouldn't let them back across for about 3 months until she got a Visa. She was working. He was a printer.

"Ted and Jenny 
[Laurence Edward Campbell and Jenny Adelaide Brown] came out to care for me when mother and dad went down there [to help Pearl with some difficulties]. He [Ted] had a sheep ranch way up the river. Then they
moved to Raymond after that. 


A US/Canada border crossing card from 1936 shows
Wm Warren Campbell, age 65, traveling by car with his
wife Alice and son Earl, (and 3 other men - 
Mr. Haycock, Lowry and Gibbs) to Burley Idaho
to visit his daughter Mrs. Pearl Jamison. It also shows his
occupation is a farmer, that he is 5' 11" tall 
of medium complexion with grey hair and eyes.












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"Earl had a car and he took mom and dad down to Pearl's. After mom and dad died we all split up and haven't come back together... I think of [my siblings]all the time. I've been here since 1949. In 52 when I was expecting, Will and Lowell came to see me in Raymond.


unknown couple may be Warren's brother Joel and spouse

"I lived in Saskatchewan. My husband's folks lived there when he was discharged. I went up to visit Earl and his wife Eileen [Warren Earl Campbell and Mary EileenCrandall]. Uncle George married Emma Cheney [George David Tolman and Emily Louise Cheney].  I met her niece in Vancouver.  ... Margie Hugh Bates had 2 little boys and she said come and babysit for me. I'll pay you 4 $ a week - I couldn't make ends meet. I believe Bates would be a shirt tail relative. Eileen and I went down and I got a job at a cannery. She helped me. Then I was on my
own.

"I have my grade one diploma. I even have my birth certificate. I wasn't baptized until 1921 in Hill Spring. Your grandpa and Ted were born at the same place. Earl tried to write all that down. I have a photo stat. It's faded but you can make it out.

William Warren Campbell's sons - left to right
Ray Everett Campbell;
George Albert Campbell;
Lowell Tolman Campbell;
Warren Earl Campbell;
Laurence Edward [Ted] Campbell 
William David Campbell far right

"I've got a picture Ruth gave me of my family. When Aunt Jennie [Adelaide Brown, Ted's wife] died they took a picture of all of us [1980]. I went walking in and stood at the end of this group and all the sudden they took the picture. I decided,'I'm not going to stand at the end. I ran around and stood in the middle. They've all got a grin trying not to laugh because I did that.

William Warren Campbell's children - left to rightRay Everett Campbell; George Albert Campell;Lowell Tolman Campbell; Elsie May Campbell Goy;Warren Earl Campbell;Laurence Edward [Ted] Campbell;William David Campbell 

"Will was as straight as he could be. When he laughs his head goes way back and then out it comes, so loud! My dad laughed like that too. Will standing there trying to keep it in with a big grin. Ray named a boy Warren.



"Pearl lived in Burley. My dad and I went to Burley with the Rasmussens after mom died. I was 17. He went to the sheep ranch to visit his brother. I didn't go. I stayed with relatives. They were 7th Day Adventist and lived in a trailer. When we'd sit down for prayer at this relatives we visited, I stayed with them and even started school, I was crying and they was crying and I guess they was trying to convert me. They don't believe in TV and Christmas."
Aunt Elsie thought these were the relatives that had the parrot.



I found a border crossing card for both Elsie and her father in 1939. They traveled with friends Thomas T. Mendenhall, his wife Nita and Emily Lee and Iona Mendenhall to Pearl's in Burley Idaho by car. Elsie is 5' 6 1/2" tall at age 17 with light brown hair and brown eyes. She can read and write and has been in the United States before.
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note that this card has his signature at the lower left

He has 40 dollars cash and intends to remain 6 months. This card also documents that he arrived in Canada at Whiskey Gap, Alberta about 1900.

The back of the card notes under the heading 'Medical Certificate', "wife died 2 months ago and desires to make a visit to get away from surroundings at home." 

Although it appears he perhaps had some difficulty crossing the border it is clear he was surrounded by loving family and friends at a difficult time. This family did much more than laugh and sing together. They loved one another.


documentation for previous marriage



Tuesday, April 17, 2012

HAPPY DAYS

Spring has sprung, the grass is riz ...
I wonder where 'dem Ames' is ...

If you drive by you will see 'dem out in the yard. It is that time of year. Saving daylight in the morning means there is some to use after work for more work - especially outside.

April is a fun month; so many flowers; so many gardening possibilities and chores, so many special dates - and so little time for everything!  We love General Conference and of special note is Easter. It is one of my favorite holidays. In Canada Good Friday is a holiday with no work or school. It often occurs in April. We usually spend that day enjoying Easter traditions.

William David Campbell with Nena 1986
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April 17 is a day of many dates! My daughter, Nena, was born on the same day as my maternal grandfather, William David Campbell. We often drove the hour from our home to his to visit with Grandma and Grandpa on or near that special date, although we could not afford the trip very often.
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Happy Birthday Nena.

Grandpa was 79 years old the day Nena was born. My mother wanted to be at her dad's birthday party with all her siblings.  She also wanted to be with us. I had been on complete bed rest for several months during this high risk pregnancy and Mom cared for me and my other 3 children. We were living with her at that time. Carrying this baby to term was a determined choice of doctors, myself and many other helpers. There were no ultrasounds to tattle gender - we did not know if a boy or a girl was coming.

My oldest son hoped for a little brother or boy cousin to play with. Five cousins were expected that spring. Imagine his disappointment when 6 girls arrived within a few weeks. "One of them could have been a boy!" he wept. He literally dropped his face into his hands and cried real tears but he loved and doted on his baby sister, and all those cousins, as much as anyone ever did.

I was in labor when Mom's sisters came to the hospital to 'pick her up'. She decided to stay despite much urging (labor might last all day and I clearly was not very uncomfortable yet). They finally left and in less than half an hour Mother saw Nena born. It was the first baby she had ever watched born. She always felt a special attachment to Nena because of that. After Nena's safe arrival I shooed her away to the party. She arrived there in time for the special dinner with all her family AND the gift to her father of the wonder of a new little great granddaughter having arrived on his birthday and doing well. Happy Birthday Grandpa!

Our April visits always provided tours of his shops, flowers, and collections. Seeing all the paintings, antiques, interesting woodwork and diamond willow, bottle, rock and coin collections took most of an afternoon or morning.  The rest of the day Great Grandma would show us her wonderful handwork, dolls and quilts.

April 17th also hosts several other important events.  My Grandpa Campbell was born on the first wedding anniversary of his parents, William Warren Campbell and Phoebe Alice Tolman.  April 17th is also the day my paternal grandfather, Neil Snow Forsyth, died. He was 98 years of age.

These significant events are separated by many years and each will be written about individually in the near future. There is no way you or I would either enjoy spending all day blogging - composing or reading.

Besides I managed to plant a few peas today. That is another favorite event that often occurs in April - my mouth waters just thinking about fresh peas and the sooner I plant them the sooner I can eat them. AND it might rain tomorrow or later in the week - April showers etc - you know? I want seeds in the ground before more showers.

Other special dates in April include the birthdays of two son-in-laws, a brother, several nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles, in-laws and David's maternal Grandfather [Clarence Charles Shelton April 7, 1888] and Great Grandmother [Frances Alois Huckins April 22, 1875].

The latter two will also be written about individually but with less priority than peas, peonies and other plants. I need to 'make hay while the sun shines' among other things!

It seems no April has enough hours or days - especially if there are showers. Perhaps some histories will have to wait a bit.  How do you decide priorities? What special events or chores and opportunities does April bring for you?

Monday, April 16, 2012

WILLIAM DAVID CAMPBELL history




Born: 17 April 1901
Bentley, Alberta Canada

My mother's father was born on his parent's first wedding anniversary.

He was also born in a hospital. That was so unusual for his time that it was remembered and noted by every person that knew of his birth. That is perhaps the only thing agreed upon. Although his family resided in the area of a small town that became Rimbey, Alberta [called 'Kansas Ridge' in what was known as the 'Northwest Territories' of Canada] I have been told that the nearest hosptial was in Bentley, Alberta, Canada.

Family records and traditions and some more formal records such as marriage and death records state his birth occurred in Rimbey and also Lacombe. His birth certificate lists Bentley, Alberta, Canada. The informant was W. Burris at Lacombe on 17 June 1901 and the return was made the 18 June 1901 at Innisfail, Alberta.

I note that a correction in Grandma Campbell's handwriting on a 'personal record' changes the place of birth from Rimbey to Bentley but on a personal record that I suspect is printed by Grandpa it says 'recorded as Bentley'. Other official records, that he filled out, say Rimbey.

Map from Google maps April 2012
Father:  William Warren Campbell (3 Aug 1871)
Son of  David William Campbell and
             Kizzie Ann Averett

Mother: Phoebe Alice Tolman (21 Aug 1875)
Daughter of William August Tolman and
                     Mirantha Althera Bates

Grandpa William David 'Bill' Campbell [about 1974] wrote: 

"My father was born in Panquitch Garfield, Utah, USA ... When he was 13 years old he started working with his father on the Union Pacific Railroad. He also herded sheep along the Grand Canyon. In 1897 he got a job with a sheepman, William Tolman, whose daughter became my mother, ... My father was with him during the sheep and cattleman war in Idaho. It was during this time that he met my mother...

" My father started to court my mother, Phebe Alice Tolman, and they were married in the spring, April 17, 1900. They decided to take the sheep camp wagon and started for Cardston, Alberta, Canada. In 1900 they were in Cardston for a short time, then decided to go further north to Lacombe, Alberta. Here they homesteaded at Bentley in the same area as the Tolmans that were already there. In September they built a sod house and broke some land. I, William David, was born in the spring of 1901 one year later and my brother 
Edward was born in 1902."

On page 47 in a book titled 'Pas-ka-poo: An Early History of Rimbey and the Upper Blindman Valley' we find Great Grandpa Tolman homesteading with 3 of his sons, William Cyrus, Ormus Albert, and Erin Layfette.


Grandpa continues, "At that time it was so wet for two years. the grain that was planted didn't ripen so they decided to move back to Cardston.

"In 1905 they started back in the same covered wagon. On the way we camped by a bridge. I wanted to play on the bridge. Mother said if you go on that bridge it will go up with you, that stopped me.

"On the way it seemed like there were a thousand Indians. Sometimes my father was away from the camp to get the horses. That was when the Indians would come into camp to bother mother. She had my brother Edward in a baby carriage. The squaws wanted to take him out of the carriage. Mother always carried a six shooter. She got it out from under the pillow and started shooting in the air.

"We arrived in Cardston in the fall of 1906 and my father started to work as operator of the Card Estate in Cardston until 1907. Then the Tolmans moved back to Cardston and built a new home there in 1907 and also a home on Belly River 3 miles south of where Hillspring is now. My father left the Cardston job and went to work for Grandfather Tolman freighting lumber from the Henery Hansen Saw Mill at Waterton Lakes. In 1909 my father bought 1/4 section of land on the East shore of Strawberry Lake south of Hillspring."

Baptized: 3 July 1910 by Robert Alroyd
Confirmed: William Warren Campbell

On Grandpa's personal record it is recorded he was confirmed in Hillspring Ward, Alberta Stake and that his father was an Elder [of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints]. The dates and other particulars for his own Priesthood ordinations and Patriarchal Blessing are also recorded.

Deacon: 4 May 1913
              Hillspring Ward, Alberta Stake
              by Thomas Davies - Elder

Patriarchal Blessing:18 June 1913
              Hillspring Ward, Alberta Stake 
              by Patriarch Henry L Hinman

Teacher: 15 or 17April 1917 
              Hillspring Ward, Alberta Stake
              by Thomas Davies - Elder

Priest: 7 or 17 January 1923 
             Hillspring Ward, Alberta Stake
             by W. H. Caldwell

Elder: 20 December 1926 
           Hillspring Ward, Alberta Stake
           by William Warren Campbell - Elder

High Priest:27 August 1978
            Hillspring Ward, Cardston Alberta Stake
            by Raymond Keith Olsen - High Priest

Endowed: 22 December 1926 6:30 pm session
           Cardston Alberta Temple

I again pick up the thread of Grandfather's autobiography, "In 1918 [my father] bought the Walter Caldwell place; 1/2 section North side of the lake. That winter I went to Claresholm Agricutlure College, with Magrath Merrill, Lorenzo Davies, Grant Caldwell.


"In 1919 [Bill is about 18 years of age] the great drought began. We planted 200 acres of wheat and got 300 bu of wheat off the Stawberry Lake bed. That fall Dad bought a new double bedded wagon box. In June we took a load of wheat to Cardston.
"When we forded the river on the way home there had been a heavy rain storm. The river had risen up and was still rising fast and the rain was still pouring down. It was dark and we could not see. We went into the river the wagon pointed straight down and the horses swimming. I could see dad. He had cut the horses loose and I was still in the box which had floated off the wheels and I was floating down river. Father had followed the horses acrossed and came looking for me. I had landed on the right side and was trying to hold onto the box which was on a sand bar. We left it there and went home going back for it the next day.

"There is a funny story attached to this wagon box also. At this time there was several coal mines in the district. As a boy I had been in these mines several times and had saw the miners set the cap and fuse for the dinamite . One day father and mother were away from home so I took some dynamite caps and started using them as firecrackers.

"One two fuses [? original wording retained] I gave it a throw and the wind blew it into the wagon box. It blew a hole about a inch long. I was really scared. I was afraid to tell what I had done. One day Father saw it. He looked at it and came over to the house and said, 'did you see that hole in the wagon box?' and I said, 'what hole?' He said, 'I just can't figure out what done it.' I did not say anything. Every day he would look at the box and wonder how it got there. I never did tell him what I had done.

"There is another story about this dinamite . It was not funny at the time. I had a stick or two hid out under the granary. I heard one day that when it got old it got hard and dangerous. So I thought I had better get rid of it.

"So I was alone this day. Father in hauling firewood from the river had hauled a large grant log or wood almost 3 feet thick. It was so tough he couldn't cut it up with axe or saw. One day I heard him say, 'If I had a stick of dinamite I'd blow it up.' So this day I got a stick of it, drilled a hole in the log centre, tamped it in, put a plug in it, set the fuse, and ran behind the house. The log disappeared. There was nothing left of it. Some was almost down at the barn.

"Then I thought, 'how am I going to explain this?' The log was right by the gate.

"When they returned home I was really scared this time. At the gate he stood looking all around. He said, 'did somebody move that log?' He never did say anything more about it. He must of had some idea."
Grandpa says he often wondered if he was the only young one to play around with dynamite. Later when working with some other men they got to talking and grandpa repeats several dynamite stories they told him from when they did similar things.

"In 1919 and 1920 there was no feed in the country. Father and Marion Brooks each took a team of horses and went north to Cold Lake. All the rest of our animals died. We had 18 head of horses die. Cattle and pigs also. Marion Brooks had one cow. His son Willard Brooks and I butchered her.

"We lost this farm and got another 1/2 section west of Hillspring on the Waterton River and lived there for 6 years. In 1917 my mother, Phebe Alice Tolman Campbell, took a nursing course under Dr. Ellis R Shipley, a lady doctor. Mother was a wonderful person and served in her nursing night and day bringing a great number of babies into the world - while raising a family of 9 children, 2 girls and 7 boys ... Edward [Ted] Lawerence... , Alberta Pearl... , Parley Merlin... , Warren Earl... , Lowell Tolman... , George Albert... , Ray Everett... , and my youngest sister Elsie May..."

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William David Campbell and Elna Bohne eating chocolate
Aunt LuRay says this is just before they were married. 

Spouse: Elna Bohne
Married: 22 December 1926
               Cardston, Alberta, Canada

Sealed: 22 December 1926 
             Cardston, Alberta, Canada
             by Edward J Wood

Died: 13 July 1990 
           Cardston, Alberta, Canada

Buried: 17 July 1990 
             Hill Spring, Alberta, Canada